Multisystemic eosinophilic epitheliotropic disease

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Multisystemic Eosinophilic Epitheliotropic Disease

Exfoliative Eosinophilic Dermatitis, Epitheliotropic Disease

Multisystemic eosinophilic epitheliotropic disease (MEED) is a type of inflammatory bowel disease which is characterized by the development of granulomas (nodules or masses) on one or more of the horse's body organs. The body organs most commonly affected include the skin and gastrointestinal tract although they can occur on any of the organs and tissues.

Presenting signs vary depending on the body systems involved however the most frequent are severe weight loss, skin lesions and mouth ulcers. Skin lesions generally start out as dry cracking and inflammation of the coronary bands which progresses to widespread crusting and exudation.

Symptoms

Recurrent colic
Severe weight loss
Severe skin lesions on the face, limbs, ventrum, and coronary bands
Mouth ulcers
Itchiness
Intermittent mild fever
Diarrhea
Lethargy
Hair loss
Nasal discharge
30%
Swollen lymph nodes
30%
Chronic cough
30%
Eye discharge
30%
Respiratory distress
30%

Diagnosis

  • History
  • Clinical signs
  • Physical exam
  • Biopsy
  • Ultrasound
  • Radiographs

Treatment

TherapiesDetails
Systemic broad-spectrum antibiotics
Hydroxyurea
Anthelmintics
Corticosteroids
Diet change

Prognosis

Poor. Affected horses are typically euthanized.

Scientific Research

General Overviews

Age Range

MEED can affect horses of any age, sex or breed but young horses (between 2 and 4 years of age) of the Standardbred and Thoroughbred breeds are more at risk.